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Category Archives: News

 

FlexFit and flame safeguard installed in existing panel using existing wiring

Preferred is bringing something BIG to the industry! 

Tired of fuel and electric waste? Want a more reliable system that also meets strict emissions standards? You know you need to upgrade, but the installation time and expense of a modern linkageless control system often just isn’t plausible…Until now.

Preferred’s new flexible solution dramatically cuts the cost and time for a linkage to linkageless control system retrofit. Now, you don’t have to upgrade your whole boiler room in order to have modern linkageless control. 

So, what do you get? A deal on a modern efficient system, significant fuel and electric savings and rebates, and an intuitive system that will keep you ahead of any emergencies.

 

It’s the flexible retrofit solution…It’s the FlexFit.

 

 

The PCC-IV loop controller is the next generation of Preferred’s loop controllers AND upgraded technology for the entire industry. The PCC-IV is more flexible, has extensive memory, and not only replaces the Preferred PCC-III, but also can replace the Siemens Moore 352 and 353, obsolete and no longer supported starting October 2017.

Preferred Utilities’s controls are just that- preferred. Consider a case study of a longtime PCC controls customer:

Preferred Utilities has been supporting this facility in New York since 1988 with our PCC II and III loop controllers. This site installed one PCC-IV and is now considering this next generation of upgrade, the PCC-IV, in their plant with four (4) 50kpph boilers, each with steam, gas, and oil flow meters.

In 1988, the facility installed 16 PCC-IIs and 5 control panels, plus field instruments for a burner/controls upgrade. Almost 10 years later in 1997, they updated the system with the purchase and installation of 17 PCC-IIIs. In 2002, they decided to upgrade again and add O2 trim. Satisfied with the Preferred product, they installed 21 of the PCC-III units.

Now, in 2017, the plant installed a PCC-IV in parallel with one of the PCC-III controls to observe the performance and is considering upgrading the rest of the PCC-II and PCC-III controls. With the auto-converting functionality of the PCC-IV, the existing PCC-III programs can be re-used without modification and re-programming.

Preferred Utilities is pleased to offer generations of quality products that age gracefully and come with a pledge of full service support and solutions for upgrades in the future.

PCC-IV Loop Controller Front

PCC-IV Loop Controller internal

 

 

 

A New Jersey paper mill came to Preferred Utilities recently needing a quote for a new burner for their 1961 Preferred Utilities Unit Steam Generator. What is wrong with their existing Preferred burner? Nothing. The plant is being forced to convert from No. 6 heavy fuel oil to natural gas.

Will their next burner last 56+ years? Maybe. It depends on who they buy it from.

Note, Preferred still had the documentation on the existing burner and boiler. But we had to go to 49 year Preferred veteran engineer Ricky Erickson to find it.

This plant needs a Low NOx burner that meets the emissions regulations in New Jersey. Preferred designs and builds burners that can meet the strictest regulations, and provides configurable NOx settings, “future-proofing” them against lower emissions requirements that states may adopt in the coming years.

Built for the environment. Built to last.

 

 

Boiler Control RetrofitIn conjunction with Puerto Rico representative M.R. Franceschini Inc., Preferred recently replaced an existing flame safeguard and oxygen trim system with the Preferred BurnerMate Universal (BMU) system on a 500 HP boiler at a pharmaceutical plant outside of San Juan.

In addition to oxygen trim, the BMU is controlling the forced draft fan variable speed drive (VSD), and providing first out annunciation of boiler trips. The BMU was integrated with the existing proprietary feedwater control system and all existing boiler limits.Boiler Control Retrofit with BMU

This steam boiler runs continuously on No. 2 oil, which is expensive in Puerto Rico, so the boiler was tuned for the lowest excess air possible at all firing rates to reduce fuel consumption.

In addition to expensive fuel, Puerto Rico has some of the most expensive electricity rates in the U.S. according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Industrial users in Puerto Rico currently pay an average of 14.6 cents/kW-hr compared to the national average of 6.54 cents/kW-hr.

Rate hikes averaging 26%BurnerMate Universal have been announced effective in 2017 for the island. With the new Preferred BMU controller, the forced draft fan VSD speed was kept under 30 Hz from low fire to mid-fire, resulting in electricity savings of over 85% compared to 60 Hz operation.

For more information on the BMU Boiler Control System, click here.

 


How much will you save?
Check out the Preferred Utilities Energy Savings Payback Calculator

Ever tried to justify a retrofit project? Now there’s a better way to crunch the numbers. This app will save you time and money. It analyzes your existing boiler and burner system data and compares it against a proposed modern upgrade, complete with energy savings estimates.

The calculation output in this application is extensive. It includes a fuel analysis, combustion efficiency (existing and projected), fuel consumption, electrical consumption, and C02 credit calculations. Use this tool if you are considering a boiler/burner upgrade.

Used for:

  • Boiler retrofits
  • Burner upgrades
  • Control upgrades
  • Energy auditing

Features:

  • Save your work
  • Recall past projects
  • Print your data
  • Compare Preferred equipment

Energy Saver Payback Tool

 

2015 was an exciting year for us at Preferred Utilities. We launched a series of new online engineering tools, we released the new Flexible System Controller (FSC), and we saw several of our engineers published in energy industry trade magazines.

To cap off the year, we attended the Power-Gen International trade show in Las Vegas, NV. The show featured a new 20×20 island booth and a never-before-seen video highlighting Preferred Special Combustion Engineering.

 

Take a look at the video below for an insight into Preferred’s many combustion capabilities:

 

 

 

Energy Savings Calculator

The Advanced Performance Inject-Aire burner blends the best of both worlds: high efficiency and low emissions. In a day and age where manufacturers compromise quality and effectiveness, Preferred Utilities prides itself in challenging the status quo. We don’t do cheap. We don’t do flimsy. We build our equipment to last—in fact, some of our burners built in the 1960s are still in operation in New York City. That’s dependability.

When it comes to decision time, many customers find themselves struggling to pick between low emissions and high efficiency—but why should you have to choose? As an added bonus, our burners can pay for themselves in just a year’s time.

So just how much energy can your application save with an API Burner?

Download our “EnergySaver Payback v8.3” to find out.

Download: Energy Savings Calculator

 

RECAP: 2014 Power-Gen Convention 

Preferred-Utilities-Power-Gen-2014

It was an excellent year for us at Preferred Utilities Manufacturing Corporation, and Power-Gen 2014 was the perfect capstone event. We were very excited to unveil our new booth and we want to thank all of you who came by to visit us during the show.

Orlando turned out to be a great experience for us. We were encouraged to meet many people, including friends, vendors, representatives, customers, and more. It was also encouraging to see so many people interested in our wide variety of product offerings. We couldn’t have asked for a better venue, either–nothing beats Florida in the middle of December!

We look forward to seeing you all again next year at Power-Gen 2015 in Las Vegas.

From us at Preferred we would like to wish you all a very Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

– Preferred Utilities MFG Corp

 

PUMC_20130213_024

Danbury, CT – A boiler system functions as a critical component to the continuous operation of a facility.  The loss of a boiler can cause disruption of operation and significant loss. Thus, it is important to maintain safe, reliable, and efficient operation while minimizing any downtime of the boiler system.

A boiler system consists of many sub-systems working in harmony, such as the boiler, the burner and its control, boiler control including feed water and draft control, fuel oil handling system (if burning oil is required), water treatment, fuel gas booster system (for areas with low supply gas pressure) etc.These sub-systems are sometimes procured from multiple sources.  In order to deliver the safe, reliable and efficient service that the end user expects, it is advantageous to adopt a “full system integration” approach.

Possible Problems

A boiler system in general could have many modes of failures.  Failures in water level control have serious implications on the longevity of the boiler and in safety (the sudden inrush of feedwater to a baked-dry boiler could lead to a steam explosion). Water treatment failures can decrease the longevity and efficiency of the boiler. Boiler operators need to understand these dangers. Among all sub-systems, the burner system is by far the most sophisticated subsystem in a boiler system. The burner system has many modes of failure that require extensive training and/or experience for the boiler operators to fully understand.

When a boiler system is not delivering satisfactory performance to the end user, it is sometimes difficult to pinpoint the exact cause of the problem. The following example is used to illustrate this difficulty. Sometimes a burner makes a low frequency noise, often called a combustion rumble. The rumble could be a nuisance or discomfort to the operators and residents nearby, or could even cause damage to property. Potential causes of the rumble include, but are not limited to:

  1. The burner has poor stability at certain firing rates; or the burner’s window of operation is too narrow. This could be related to the design or manufacturing of the burner.
  2. The air/ fuel ratio is improper due to poor commissioning or lack of maintenance.
  3. The servos used by the burner control may have poor accuracy or repeatability.
  4. The linkage between servos and dampers may be loose.
  5. The system does not have oxygen trim to ensure consistent excess air levels. Any variation in draft, ambient temperature, fuel gas composition, building ventilation (affecting building inside pressure vs. outside ambient pressure), or wind speed blowing on outlet of chimney, can affect the amount of combustion air supplied by the fan.
  6. Lack of draft control.  Severe draft variation may cause the air/fuel ratio to go out of range.  This is definitely a challenge if the system does not have an oxygen trim system; it can be a problem even with an oxygen trim if the draft variation is too severe for the oxygen trim to compensate.
  7. The “acoustic coupling” between the burner and the boiler’s fire chamber and the subsequent space the flue gas flows through.
  8. The fuel gas booster could surge and cause the gas pressure to oscillate, beyond the pressure regulator’s ability to regulate.
  9. The boiler room’s ventilation system could be improperly designed. When windows and doors are shut, a significant negative pressure can develop in the boiler room, causing a drop in combustion air supply and air/fuel ratio.
  10. Fuel gas supply pressure and composition can fluctuate, especially if the fuel gas is from an alternative fuel source, such as land fill gas or, to a lesser degree, digester gas.
  11. Burner components may not work well together. For example, the gas regulator may be over-sized for the flow rates of the burner.

Problems with the Multiple-Vendor Approach

Fully integrated custom controlsWhen the subsystems are procured from many different vendors piece-meal (by the general contractor or the end user) and no engineering firm takes responsibility for integrating these subsystems, it may be difficult to identify the party responsible for correcting the problem. This often results in blame shifting among different parties, ultimately frustration for the end user.

For example: in a piece-meal approach, the burner may be supplied by a burner company, the controls may be supplied by a company that is solely dedicated to burner controls and knows little about the combustion behaviors of the particular burner. The specifications do not call for a draft control or oxygen trim, when in reality one or both of those may be required for the site conditions and requirements. The booster, if there is one for the job, may be supplied by yet another vendor, the commissioning may be done by a contractor, the ventilation system of the boiler room may not have been designed properly to avoid high negative building pressure.  The troubleshooting process itself is further complicated by the diverging interests of the different parties involved.

Sole Source Responsibility

The most important advantage of the full system integration approach is that the integrator must accept sole source responsibility. If the burner system does not perform, the integrator is responsible for correcting the problem. There is no blame shifting among different suppliers.XPlus

A burner system supplier that adopts the full system integration approach is inclined to build a long term relationship whenever it sells a job. The supplier would look at the specific conditions and requirements of the customer, and look for the best solution tailored for the job instead of chasing the latest trendy requirement in specifications. For example, it may be tempting to ask for a 12:1 or higher turndown from the burner system, but can the non-condensing boiler operate at 12:1 or higher turndown without condensation and corrosion problems?  Is 10:1 or 8:1 turndown enough for the job? In another example, does the system require a draft control device to work? Can the burner deliver satisfactory performance without the draft system?

A supplier adopting the full system integration approach would look at total costs of ownership (the fixed costs and the operating costs) for the boiler system, instead of focusing on the fixed costs. In today’s corporate procurement practices, too often the one responsible for buying the boiler system is not the one paying the energy bill, hence there is less incentive to consider the total costs of ownership.

For example, a burner capable of operating at 1.5-2.5% oxygen during the majority of its operation time can lead to significant savings in fuel costs.  If a vendor offers a burner system without use of  oxygen trim, is the burner operating at consistent excess air levels all year round? Does the lack of oxygen trim mean conservatively high excess air levels? In another example, a fiber mesh burner may be used to meet 9 ppm NOx requirements without FGR, but the additional costs of fuel due to the very high excess air levels (typically 8-9% oxygen dry in flue gas) and the costs of replacing filters and fiber mesh combustion heads need to be factored in when purchasing a burner system. In another example, a burner constructed with flimsy, low grade sheet metals may need frequent service and replacement parts, while a burner constructed out of durable steel can provide years of service beyond the normal warranty periods.

The “full system integration” approach requires an integrator to have in-depth understanding and strong product offerings in all of the following areas:

  1. Boiler controls. The boiler controls ensure safe and smooth operation (water level control, burner firing rate based on temperature or pressure, draft control if necessary). It should have the capability to manage the lead-lag control of multiple boilers to ensure the boilers are operating at maximum efficiency.
  2. Fuel oil handling systems (main tank, day tank, pump sets, filtration, leak detection, etc.)
  3. Burners–especially those designed for both high efficiency and low emissions at the same time. The end user should not be forced to choose between high efficiency and low NOx.  High turndown (such as 10:1) helps avoid cycling of the boiler, and low excess air minimizes loss of heat to flue gas. Use of FGR is acceptable, but the incremental costs of running a larger motor due to FGR should be factored in. Advanced designs of burners can achieve mandated NOx emissions with less, little, or no FGR (depending on the NOx levels required).
  4. Burner controls.  The burner must be equipped with the latest Burner Management/ Combustion Control Systems (BMS/CCS) to assure that safety aspects are in accordance with the latest requirements of NFPA 85 and CSD-1. When high efficiency or tight emissions are required,  an oxygen trim system should be included, and parallel positioning or fully metered control should be used in lieu of jackshaft. The combustion control and the servos should be designed to modulate the controlled fluids (air, fuel, FGR etc.) in a coordinated manner.  For example, if the air servo cannot move fast enough to be in sync with the fuel servo, then the fuel servo needs to be slowed down in modulation, and vice versa.
  5. Commissioning and maintenance.  The burner system is commissioned and maintained by qualified service technicians that are knowledgeable about all the subsystems.
  6. Technical support and spare parts. These should be available from nearby locations.

Preferred Utilities Manufacturing Corporation has earned a reputation for accepting single-source responsibility. We firmly believe in the advantages of full system integration. Compared to the piece-meal approach, the benefits of full system integration make the choice clear. If you believe the same way, please contact us about your next project.

 

Carrolton, Texas — By David Eoff

It seems the new buzzword for our industry is Mission Critical. It’s the name of a trade magazine that caters to data centers. It’s also a term marketers use when they want to impress upon people that their equipment is installed at important facilities.

Preferred Utilities recently did a fuel oil project at a building that might be termed mission critical. This building will house the airline communication center (ACC) for one of the largest airlines in the country. The FAA requires that airlines be in constant communication with all their active planes at all times.

If they lose communication with a plane, that plane can’t fly. If it’s in the air, the plane has to land. If the airline’s ACC loses power, all their planes are immediately grounded. Losing communications with aircraft would require the airline to ground its fleet, resulting in a huge negative impact across the national airspace system.

Emergency Generator

The building that houses the ACC is on grid power. But it also has three generators, each with it’s own over-sized belly tank. The airline wanted this building to be tornado resistant, so the generators, belly tanks, and fuel supply system is all below grade. We provided Model 3 fill boxes so even the fill lines for the belly tanks are underground.

The generator to the left is one of three that can provide power for the building if the grid power fails. The Preferred PWC-based fuel controller provides tank gauging, leak detection, and overfill protection for the belly tanks for the three generators.

The image to the bottom right shows tank 1 being filled during final construction of the building. The Preferred system provides tank volume display at the fill port, as well as an overfill alarm at 85% full, and will shut off the fill line at 95% full.

Underground Fill Tank

Each generator has enough fuel to power the building for at least 24 hours. In addition, the airline pays a steep premium to be high priority for fuel delivery trucks. Their priority level is just below local hospitals in an emergency. The facility people have my cell phone number too. I live 20 minutes from the building and will respond if something goes wrong.

But who says that mission critical systems can’t be pretty, too? In addition to being tornado resistant, the Preferred Model 3 fill boxes can be hidden behind mulch and shrubberies to offer an aesthetically pleasing appearance. Look at the photo below if you don’t believe us.

 

Underground fill tank
 

In case you haven’t heard, we recently showcased our new BurnerMate Light at the 2014 AHR Expo.PMC-004

 

BurnerMate Light

BurnerMate Light

PMC-004The BurnerMate Light is an economical, state-of-the-art microcomputer-based burner management system with built-in first-out annunciation and combustion control designed for a single burner boiler or process heat application.

Meant to provide a scaled-down, economical alternative to our powerful BurnerMate Universal system,  the BurnerMate Light offers standby, purge, low fire ignition, main fuel light off, and release to modulate sequencing for oil and gas fired burners.

 For more information on this fully UL approved product, check out the full product page.