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PWC Understanding What The LED's Mean

FILED UNDER: ATPS, Chief Dispatcher, JC-CDST, PI Catalog, PI PWC, PU PWC, PWC, PWC Pump Set, TGEL-D5

Symptom

The PWC Controller has seven available slots in the chassis. They are referred to as Slot Position 0 through Slot position 6 going from left to right. Slot 0 is always for the CPU. The other slots are available for any of five different types of cards, each of which has its own function. The use of the controller determines which and how many of each card is required. Each card has LED indicator lights which convey controller status and can help the operator during troubleshooting or just to give the operator a quick overview of how the controller is behaving.

Steps to Troubleshoot

CPU Board (190601): CPU OK - Light RUN – Light FORCED – Light BATTERY – Light ALARM – Lights (2) COM 2 (Tx) Light COM2 (Rx) - Light CPU OK – This light blinks during normal operation. RUN – During normal operation this light is on steady. FORCED – This function is not enabled so it will never go on. BATTERY – This light should be on steady which indicates a good battery. ALARM – If the controller is in alarm these lights will blink back and forth until the alarm condition is corrected. COM 2 (Tx) – This light is the RS 485 communication transmit light. It blinks rapidly when the controller is transmitting to another device. COM 2 (Rx) – This light is the RS 485 communication receive light. It blinks rapidly when the controller is receiving from another device. Note: COM 1 has no light associated with it. This is Serial communication which only goes in one direction. The signal is sent out only. DIN Board (190608): This board has fifteen (15) LED lights in a vertical orientation arranged in five groups of three each. These fifteen lights each represent a separate discrete 120Vac input. The lights will be on if V > 90 Volts. Each of the groups of three have an isolated common. Each of the commons (Terminals 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20) should be wired to a neutral terminal, (Terminals 25 or 26). The 120Vac power comes from one of the power terminals at the bottom of the board, (Terminals 21, 22, 23 or 24). It goes to some sort of switch or series of switches and then to one of the 15 input terminals. If the switch is closed, there will be 120 volts between the input and its respective neutral terminal, and the LED corresponding to the input will be ON. If the switch is open, the light corresponding to that input will be OFF. The status of the different inputs signals is interpreted by the CPU logic (blockware) which then causes the controller to react accordingly. The LEDs do not indicate alarms; they merely indicate 120Vac coming to their respective terminals. HOA-ROUT Board, Hand-Off-Auto Relay Output (190611): This board has five sets of relay contacts. Each set of contacts represents one channel, Channel 1 – Channel 5. Each channel has a green LED light and a red LED Light. The green light represent whether or not the logic of the CPU has determined that the contacts should be closed. The red light indicates whether or not the contacts are actually closed. Also at each channel, is a three position switch, (Hand-Off-Auto). Depending on which position the switch is in, and whether the CPU wants the contacts to be closed, the lights will be ON or OFF as follows: Hand Off Auto CPU Commands Close Contacts Green On Red On Contacts Closed Green On Red Off Contacts Open Green On Red On Contacts Closed CPU Commands Open Contacts Green Off Red On Contacts Closed Green Off Red Off Contacts Open Green Off Red Off Contacts Open From the diagram above, if the switch is in Hand, the contacts will be closed regardless of whether the CPU logic wants them to be. Also, when the switch is in the off position, the contacts are open regardless of whether the CPU logic wants them to be. Only when the switch is in the Auto position does the CPU logic determine if the contacts are open or closed. The 120Vac power can come from the bottom of the board, terminals 21 or 22, to the common terminal of the channel, (Terminals 2, 4, 6, 8 and10), out to the device and then return to neutral, (Terminals 23, 24, 25 or 26). ROUT Board, Relay Output (190617): The ROUT Board has eight red LEDs, one for each channel/relay. Whether the contacts of each relay are open or closed is determined by the CPU logic only. The top two of the eight relays have a set of normally open contacts and a set of normally closed contacts. The other six of the eight relays only have normally closed contacts. When the CPU logic energizes a relay, its contacts go from their normal condition to the opposite condition and the red LED for that channel turns ON to indicate that status. The 120Vac power can come from the bottom of the board, terminals 21 or 22, to the common terminal of the channel, (Terminals 2, 4, 6, 8 and10), out to the device and then return to neutral, (Terminals 23, 24, 25 or 26). Sometimes the 120Vac comes from an outside source to the common terminal, through the contact out to whatever load the user has in mind and then to the neutral of that power source. AIN Board, Universal Analog Input (190609): The AIN board has eight analog input channels and each channel can be set for any one of four different types of low voltage inputs. 1. 2-wire, 4-20 mA input 2. Thermistor 3. Thermocouple or 0-5 Vdc input 4. 0-15 Vdc Pulse There are eight red LED lights, each one representing the status of its respective input. When the PWC detects an input signal between -3% and 103% of the input range, the red LED will be ON, otherwise it will be OFF. A/M AOUT Board, Auto/Manual Station analog Output (190613): The A/M-AOUT Board has five channels, each with a choice of a 4-20 mA or a 135Ω output depending on which of the two daughter boards is installed at that channel. Each channel has a 2-position switch for putting the output in Automatic Mode or Manual Mode, a knob for adjusting the output when in manual mode and a column of ten (10) LED lights. The lights reflect the controller’s output as a percentage of its total range. When the switch for a channel is in Manual Mode, the number of LEDs illuminated changes with the knob position/output level. As the knob is turned clockwise, the output increases toward 100% and as it does the number of LEDs illuminated increases until all ten LEDs are lit which represents 100% output. If the channel is in Automatic Mode, the number of lit LEDs represents the percentage of the total range of the output that the CPU logic is calling for. If the CPU is not calling for any output at a channel, no LEDs will be lit at that channel.

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