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Made in the U.S.A., this project demonstrated a a sustainable, safe reclamation of waste hydrogen with high efficiency and carbon foot print reduction.

An American based chemical manufacturer decided to make use of their waste hydrogen which significantly reduced their use of fossil fuel for their process steam requirements. But the customer needed the right company to deliver a controls, burner, boiler, fuel handling, blending, and a balance of plant integrated combustion package. They came to Preferred Utilities Manufacturing for a total combustion design solution which included a custom (IBEW / UL 508) PLC flame safe guard system with integrated combustion control, fuel ratio control, boiler water control and balance of plant interface. A 10″ touch screen operator interface with plant wide SCADA communications provides easy process / efficency monitoring and trouble shooting operations.

For single source responsibility, significant energy savings, and unsurpassed combustion engineering expertise, choose Preferred.

 
  1. NOx in Heating oil is significantly reduced: heating oil can contain less than 15 parts per million of sulfer. That is a 200-fold decrease in sulfer since 2014.
  2. Heating oil is a partially renewable fuel: more and more heating oils contain 2% – 5% plant derived biofuel, and likely to increase over time. Biofuel is a renewable energy source which also helps heating oil burn more completely while also helping your oil tank stay clean and free of sediment.
  3. Heating oil is safer than natural gas: on Sept. 13, 2018, old natural gas lines ruptured in an area of north of Boston, Mass, causing a series of explosions and fires damaging 40 homes and causing the death of a teenage boy. Gas service to more than 8000 homes was shut off, and some homes were without central heating more than a month later. This not an isolated incident – there are an estimated 23-26 gas explosions with 5-8 fatalities that happen across the country every year. (https://www.reuters.com/article/us-massachusetts-explosions-factbox/factbox-gas-distribution-line-related-accidents-in-the-united-states-idUSKCN1LU05A)
 

Our SECOND burner and controls retrofit for Bates College on one of their existing 700 HP Cleaver-Brooks™ boilers so they can burn ENSYN Renewable Fuel Oil (100% renewable fuel source derived from trees) as their primary heating source! With our help, Bates is on the verge of reaching their 2020 emissions and carbon reduction milestones while increasing combustion efficiency and reducing electric consumption.

Read the full story here.

 

 

An innovative, low-cost combustion solution to meet sustainability goals, emission reduction requirements, and extreme efficiency improvements.

This installation is at an American college with aggressive sustainability goals. Our solution for them–a burner and controls upgrade on one of their existing 700 HP Cleaver Brooks boilers to achieve their emission and carbon reduction milestones, while increasing combustion efficiency and reducing electric consumption. This upgrade will NOT require the removal of the Cleaver Brooks front or rear doors, but acts as a direct replacement “insert” for the existing Cleaver Brooks burner, while reusing the existing Cleaver Brooks combustion fan and making no cuts or modifications in the original front door.

This specialized API-Ranger burner and controls upgrade will allow the college to burn ENSYN Renewable Fuel Oil, an 85% carbon neutral renewable fuel, along with natural gas or #2 oil.

American made and supported, our technological advancements continue to out-pace the competition.

 

Combined Heat and Power or CHP refers to using the waste heat in the exhaust of a turbine or engine to make steam or hot water. Preferred is getting active in CHP projects with Williams & Davis boilers of Dallas, TX. Their specially designed boilers can accept the exhaust from a diesel generator to make steam or hot water. For this project, Preferred supplied an API-AF burner to fire the boiler to full steam capacity when the engine isn’t running or isn’t producing enough waste heat to meet the plant’s thermal demand.

CHP projects make sense anywhere electricity is very expensive, fuel is cheap, and customers have a relatively constant demand for steam or hot water. Instead of purchasing electricity off the grid, a plant or building owner can purchase a natural gas- or diesel-fired generator, and use the hot exhaust to make steam or hot water for building heating. The Preferred burner allows the steam or hot water production to be independent of building electrical load.

Electric utilities actually encourage this practice because when customers provide their own electricity, they are peak shaving for the utility. During peak electricity usage periods, like hot Texas afternoons in August, the utilities are running all of their generating plants to meet demand, including their oldest, least efficient plants. The utilities lose money selling electricity from their oldest plants, so they incentivize customers to make their own electricity during these periods in the hopes the utility won’t have to fire up their oldest generating plants. In the aftermath of hurricane Sandy, people living in buildings with back-up power and heating became very popular for friends to come by, charge up their devices, take a hot shower, and have a hot meal.

CHP covers a lot of different ways to provide both electricity and steam or hot water to a facility. This approach with Preferred and Williams & Davis is geared towards customers that have steam or hot water loads between 200 HP and 1,000 HP, and need the flexibility to fire the boiler at any load regardless of generator load. If you have customers that may be interested in this CHP approach, contact David Eoff for more details.

 

For reliability, longevity and unmatched service, choose Preferred!

This Preferred JC-CDDF2 chief dispatcher model has been in service since the 1970’s in a Newport, RI facility. When one of the relay sockets finally broke, they called Preferred.

Although this unit has been out of production for nearly 20 years, we still had replacement parts in stock and original wiring diagrams for the installation of the new parts.

Built in the USA and built to last!

 

-Today’s Boilers


This is a Letter to the Editor written by David Eoff of Preferred Utilities to Today’s Boiler regarding an article in the Spring 2018 edition called: Warning–A Boiler Breakdown may be in your Future story.

As Geoff Halley, the author of this article stated, the low water cutout switches that prevent a boiler from dry firing are prone to failure, and require periodic maintenance and testing. Low water cutout float switches can become stuck due to accumulation of sediment on the float mechanism, or due to the float getting deformed and sticking against the side of the switch housing. Probe type low water cutouts can fail due to accumulation of sediment on the probes, broken wires, and malfunctioning relays. Both types of low water cutout devices can be wired wrong, or intentionally jumpered by boiler operators.

As a back-up to traditional, code required low water cutoff switches, Preferred Utilities recommends a high stack temperature cutoff be installed in all boilers. A high stack temperature cutoff set at 200-300 degrees F. over normal stack temperature will quickly shut the boiler down if it is dry fired, and is not likely to cause nuisance trips. The high stack temperature cutout usually consists of a thermocouple installed in the stack that reports back to the boiler flame safeguard controller. Preferred Utilities’ BurnerMate Universal and BurnerMate TS controllers have included this feature for decades. Preferred’s JC-15D stack temperature monitor will open a dry contact if the stack temperature goes above a pre-determined setpoint and can be added to virtually any flame safeguard system.

Several Preferred Utilities representatives and technicians have reported these high stack temperature cutoff devices have saved boilers from dry firing when the traditional low water cutoff switches failed. People who have experienced a close call like this insist on installing a high stack temperature cutoff on every future boiler.

A stack temperature thermocouple is inexpensive, reliable, reads constantly so you know the device is working, and requires no maintenance. It’s cheap, reliable insurance against a catastrophic dry firing event.”

–David Eoff

 

The EPA made changes to the 1988 Underground Storage Tank (UST) regulations back in 2015, but the changes have not gone into effect until a date soon approaching, October 13, 2018. According to the EPA, the changes to the UST regulations are because of new technology proven to be reliable and accurate and the wide variety of new fuels on the market.

There are four main reasons for the EPA’s changes to the UST regulations: 

·       Operating and maintaining UST equipment properly

·       Prevent and detect UST spills and Releases

·       Protect against groundwater pollution

·       Even standard for all UST


Below are some of the following new changes to the EPA regulations that must be completed by October 13, 2018.

1.       Secondary Containment, Interstitial Leak Detection, Dispenser Containment1

When installing or replacing UST and piping owners must install secondary containment. Along with secondary containment, the owner must place interstitial monitoring as spill monitoring in these new tanks and pipes. Every new UST must have an Under-Dispenser Containment (UDC) installed.

2.       New Minimum Training Requirements2

Each operator working with a UST must be trained on the equipment by the manufacturer. Class A and B operators must receive training before October 13, 2018, or within 30 days of returning to work responsibilities. Class C workers must be trained before October 13, 2018.

3.       Walk Through Checks and Tests of Equipment3

Every 30 days the following equipment must be checked and tested: spill prevention equipment, release detection equipment, containment sump testing, and release detection system.

4.       Updated Criteria for Storing New Fuels4

New regulations for UST storing new emerging fuels.

5.       Past Deferrals for equipment were Removed5 6

The old deferral system for emergency generator tanks, field constructed tanks (FCT), airport hydrant systems (AHS) and wastewater treatment tank systems has changed due to new technology giving operators the ability to correctly and securely monitor these tanks.

6.       Updated Codes of Practice7 

New and updated codes of practice.

7.       State Program Approval (SPA)8

The EPA now requires that your state follow the new updated changes made to the UST regulations, even if you are in Indian country.

For a comprehensive list of changes made by the EPA go to: https://www.epa.gov/ust/revising-underground-storage-tank-regulations-revisions-existing-requirements-and-new#compliance

For a more detailed breakdown of each change go to: https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2015-07/documents/regs2015-crosswalk.pdf

These kind of changes blindside many facilities. Preferred Utilities can help. We provide expertise along with a wide variety of valves, leak detection probes, and tank monitoring systems that help facilities keep up to date with the new regulation compliance. Preferred Utilities’ full staff of knowledgeable engineers work to keep the best products available, so your facility stays safe, secure and compliant. 

For the full line of services and products Preferred Utilities Manufacturing Corporation offers please click on the link below or call 203-743-6741.

Preferred Utilities Manufacturing Corporation

 

 

References and Links

1. https://www.epa.gov/ust/secondary-containment-and-under-dispenser-containment-2015-requirements

2. https://www.epa.gov/ust/operator-training-minimum-training-requirements-and-training-options

3. https://www.epa.gov/ust/operating-and-maintaining-ust-systems-2015-requirements

4. https://www.epa.gov/ust/emerging-fuels-and-underground-storage-tanks-usts

5. https://www.epa.gov/ust/emergency-power-generator-ust-systems-2015-requirement-release-detection

6. https://www.epa.gov/ust/field-constructed-tanks-and-airport-hydrant-systems-2015-requirements

7. https://www.epa.gov/ust/underground-storage-tanks-usts-laws-and-regulations#code

8. https://www.epa.gov/ust/state-underground-storage-tank-ust-programs#which

 
 
As the city’s apartment complex managers know all too well, New York City’s electricity rates are some of the highest in the country. Surprisingly, one of the biggest sources of energy usage for these structures is often the building’s boiler, which runs nearly continuously through the long, cold winter.

 

That is why it’s not a bad idea to start thinking of upgrading to a boiler that will give off fewer emissions, in the middle of the summer.

The Big Apple also has some of the worst smog in the country. Though it has improved since peak levels in the mid-20th century as a result of national restrictions on nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions, New York City does not currently regulate NOx emissions at the local level. This is likely to change. Responding to public pressures for clean air, states and municipalities across the country have brought the locally allowable NOx emissions far below federal standards, often focusing on large boiler emissions. Most of California, for instance, holds boiler emissions to a strict nine parts per million NOx limit. Other states have enacted more moderate standards of 20 to 30 parts per million. At some point, this trend will reach New York, and building owners who take the long view are already planning for it.

Solving these two problems—reducing the electricity cost of boilers and bringing down their emissions—are seemingly at odds. Ultra-low NOx emissions burners use more power because they burn fuel at lower temperatures over a longer period of time. However, with recent advancements in boiler technology, there are a couple of ways that New York building owners can strike a balance between saving on electricity in the short term and future proofing against emissions regulations likely to be enacted in the future.

First would be combustion control.

Whether you’re burning oil or natural gas, fuel must be delivered to the burner along with air (oxygen) at specific ratios, which account for variables, such as humidity and temperature. Traditionally, this is accomplished manually using a jackshaft linkage to set the ratio. These systems are inherently difficult to keep configured correctly because bolts connecting the linkage loosen over time, allowing incorrect amounts of fuel or air to be delivered to the burner, which has a surprisingly large negative impact on efficiency.

The alternative to jackshaft linkages (which still account for the majority of burners in New York City) is a more modern parallel positioning system in which the fuel and air valves are monitored and adjusted digitally. There is no slippage in these systems, and configuration settings can be dialed in precisely on a computer. Simply by maintaining optimal fuel and oxygen proportions, the system reduces both emissions and electricity costs. The only downside is the installation, which can run as much as $20,000 due to custom design and wiring. Despite the long-term benefits, this upgrade can be hard to fit into the tight budgets of many New York City apartment buildings.

In just the last few years, new parallel positioning systems that are “plug and play” drop-in replacements for older jackshaft systems have become available. This reduces installation costs to as low as $5,000, which in most cases pays for itself in the first year of reduced electricity costs. Stapleton Houses, one of the largest housing developments on Staten Island, found that its heating system, some of which dated back to the complex’s construction in 1960, had grown quite inefficient in its electrical and natural gas use. The New York City Housing Authority brought in a parallel positioning system and reduced electrical usage of its boiler by 75 percent.

Second would be choosing between using less power and making fewer emissions.

For some time now, ultra-low NOx burners that meet the strictest standards have been available. For facilities with older burners, switching to a modern ultra-low NOx burner may reduce electricity use simply because older burners are so inefficient. However, a burner with moderate NOx emissions would be even more fuel efficient and potentially use even less electricity.

This creates a dilemma: should one choose the future-proofing of an ultra-low NOx burner or the reduced electrical costs of a moderate NOx burner? Recently developed configurable NOx emissions technology allows building owners to have it both ways. These systems allow the NOx emissions to be adjusted with a few keystrokes so that New York City facilities can enjoy maximum efficiency in the short term, and easily adjust to meet new standards as they are enacted.

Fix the Boiler in July to Limit Emissions in the Winter!

Dan Wallace is the vice president of research and development at Preferred Utilities Manufacturing Corporation.

 

Do you know all of Preferred’s capabilities?

Our products include fuel oil handling systems and components, boiler instrumentation and controllers, high quality burners and nuclear power plant outage reduction tools and component parts. Continuous research and development is applied to our existing products and is helping us to lead the industry with new and innovative power plant solutions.

Take a trip through our headquarters/ manufacturing facility and catch a glimpse of our engineering and production team at work!