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Pressure atomization depends on the oil pressure inside the nozzle tip to spray a fine mist of oil, very similar to a Windex spray bottle. The micronized oil droplets are flung into the burner head, where they are thoroughly mixed with the combustion air and ignited. As mentioned above, the pressure at the oil nozzle is the key factor in the atomization process; therefore, your oil pump and pressure regulator are the key components in this system. The pump needs to be able to meet the gallons per hour (gph) requirement for the burner/boiler to meet their load capacity. The pressure regulator is set in accordance to the firing rate which is normally between 100-300 (psi). The turndown ratio for a pressure atomizing burner is normally only 3:1 or 4:1.

However, Preferred has just designed and shipped our first high turndown, 6:1 guaranteed, pressure atomized API-AF burners.

These API-AF burners are UL listed for No. 2 oil firing, utilizing pressure atomization. We demonstrated a turndown of 8:1 on pressure atomized oil firing to the UL inspector, extending the normal turndown ratio which is usually only 3:1 or 4:1

 

Preferred’s R&D department made such significant improvements to the JC-30D opacity monitor, we re-branded it the JC-30D-EZ. The new opacity monitor is EZ to install, EZ to setup, and EZ to calibrate.

What’s New?

  • With the new LED light source, there is nothing to adjust on the light source side of the opacity monitor. So the adjustable mount has been replaced with a rigid pipe mount.
  • Because the new detector lens is directional, the new receptor can’t see ambient light coming in from severe angles, so the light shields are not required anymore.
  • The electronics in the light source have been improved to allow calibration from the display. The DIP switches, pushbutton, and potentiometer are gone, so calibration can be initiated from the display on the ground and there is no need to go up on the stack anymore.

The JC-30D-EZ can be set up to auto-calibrate every time the burner shuts down to compensate for increasing soot on the source and detector lenses. This means lenses can go up to nine times longer between cleanings!

Dirty lenses can cause high stack opacity shutdowns on previous, and competing opacity monitors. The JC-30D-EZ’s ability to auto-calibrate itself to adjust for dirty lenses makes a high opacity shutdown much less likely.

Congratulations to the R&D department for making the JC-30D-EZ best opacity monitor on the market. We especially want to share the good news with New York City, Boston, and elsewhere where opacity monitors are required by code. The new JC-30D-EZ can be retrofitted to older JC-30 opacity monitors, and it can replace existing Smoke Watchman units.

 

With the NEW and improved Opacity Monitor model JC-30D with Automatic Calibration, LED light source, and light detector, no onsite operator is required to calibrate the system. When the system receives a signal from the burner fan, it auto calibrates opacity by itself, compensating for dirty lenses.

Auto-Calibrate coupled with the new brighter LED light source allows the lenses to go without cleaning for up to 9 times as long as previous versions. This saves on labor cost for unmanned boiler rooms and operators can focus on other tasks in their boiler room. The improved light sensor now directs light only from the light source and eliminates misreading from tramp light, which can cause problems in the boiler room.

The new JC-30D is an easy retrofit for older JC-30D models, as well as other opacity monitors. Durable quality and made in the U.S.A.!

 

FlexFit and flame safeguard installed in existing panel using existing wiring

Preferred is bringing something BIG to the industry! 

Tired of fuel and electric waste? Want a more reliable system that also meets strict emissions standards? You know you need to upgrade, but the installation time and expense of a modern linkageless control system often just isn’t plausible…Until now.

Preferred’s new flexible solution dramatically cuts the cost and time for a linkage to linkageless control system retrofit. Now, you don’t have to upgrade your whole boiler room in order to have modern linkageless control. 

So, what do you get? A deal on a modern efficient system, significant fuel and electric savings and rebates, and an intuitive system that will keep you ahead of any emergencies.

 

It’s the flexible retrofit solution…It’s the FlexFit.

 

 

Preferred’s Fuel Oil Handling and Boiler Control Cabinets now have California’s OSHPD Seismic Preapproval. This certification, required by the building code for all hospitals and large nursing facilities in California, verifies the integrity of manufacturer’s equipment and components in event of a seismic disturbance, an earthquake. Through “shake table testing,” Preferred’s boiler and fuel oil handling panels have received the certification that proves its functional ability survive an earthquake and keep your facility running.

 

Preferred is happy to announce Simoneau Sterling Midwest is Preferred’s new exclusive representative for Minnesota, Iowa, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. Todd Moore, now with Simoneau Sterling Midwest, has been a valuable partner to Preferred over the years. We look forward to working with Todd on many more great projects, supported by Simoneau Sterling’s engineering and manufacturing.”

 

Last summer a facility in Texas spilled 3,500 gallons of diesel fuel intended for one of their emergency generators. The fuel was pushed up through a day tank vent, ran across their parking lot, and into a pond adjacent to their property. The clean-up team recovered about 2,100 gallons of fuel out of the pond, but at a cost of about $300,000.

I was called to the site two weeks after the spill and took these pictures of the pond. It’s amazing how resilient nature can be in Texas. The only damage I could see to the pond was browned grass below the waterline. Now, ten months later, the pond appears to have fully recovered.

 

The generator fueling system for this facility was installed in 2013. From an inspection of the day tanks, all the instrumentation and safety devices met the required NFPA and local fire codes. However, I did not recognize the systems integrator who did the PLC controls. I suspected there was an error in the PLC program exacerbated by a system design that didn’t anticipate something going wrong.

 

The facility owner brought in a couple of sharp corporate engineers to autopsy the existing controls. They found errors in the PLC programming logic. A level sensor failed, showing a low fuel level in the day tank, so the PLC controls energized supply pumps to re-fill the day tank from the main storage tank. With the level sensor stuck, the PLC controls ignored all the other instrumentation indicating the tank was full, continued pumping fuel, and quickly overfilled the tank. The facility engineers thought the system started pumping fuel at about midnight. Facility staff coming on duty at 7 a.m. smelled diesel fuel, noticed the fuel on the ground, and shut off the pumps.

 

At first glance, the control sequences for diesel generator fueling systems are not terribly complicated, so local systems integrators are often hired to provide controls for fueling systems. However, to ensure fuel is always available to mission critical emergency generators, and fuel spills are prevented, the Preferred engineers—who specialize in the design of generator fueling systems—try to anticipate every likely failure mode:

 

–What happens if a level sensor gets stuck?

–What happens if an analog transmitter fails and produces 0 milliamps?

–What should the controls do if a pump fails to prove flow?

–What happens if there is a break in a fuel line, or a tank starts to leak?

–What happens if an operator manually energizes a fuel transfer pump and then goes home?

 

After supplying so many fueling systems over the years, all of these failures will happen. Regardless of a component failure or operator error, fuel spills are still unacceptable, and the generators still need fuel.

 

I did boiler controls for twenty years before learning how to design and commission fuel handling systems. NFPA boiler code dictates all the safety devices and sequences required to operate boilers. As a result, at least three separate devices must fail to run the water out of a boiler, or overpressure a boiler. NFPA code for fueling systems is much less specific. In fact, the fuel system that caused the spill at this facility didn’t violate any NFPA fuel handling codes.

 

In the end, this facility’s Preferred installer and consulting engineer commissioned the new Preferred fuel handling system controls. Commissioning is the process of simulating all the “What happens if…” scenarios described above and verifying the fuel system responds correctly to all imaginable upset conditions.

 

It’s the last thing we do on every fuel handling project.

David Eoff, BSME, MBA

Preferred Utilities, National Sales Manager

 

RFO-headerDiscussions of sustainable energy don’t often include food flavorings. However, the same process that creates liquid smoke—the stuff you can buy at the grocery store to add a smoky flavor to just about anything—can produce liquid wood, a very environmentally friendly fuel.

You may not have heard of liquid wood because, until very recently, it was quite difficult to burn effectively. Preferred Utilities Manufacturing changed this.

Liquid smoke is part of a family of products whereby wood is converted from a solid into a liquid. Wood pulp is heated in the absence of oxygen during a process called pyrolysis. This produces bio-oil—or liquid wood.

Unlike petroleum or natural gas, liquid wood fuel is a 100% renewable resource: the wood used to create the fuel can be balanced by replanting new trees. Liquid wood is also carbon efficient because the replanted trees offset carbon emissions, which eliminates the need to purchase separate carbon offsets. As a result, liquid wood is 81 percent more carbon efficient than natural gas, and 88 percent more carbon efficient than petroleum.

Once it’s being properly fed to the burner, liquid wood behaves pretty much just like traditional fuel oils. This means that existing boiler equipment can be retrofitted for use with liquid wood, dramatically decreasing conversion costs compared to other biofuels.Green Oil

So why haven’t we seen the widespread adoption of liquid wood as a fuel oil? After all, the basic chemistry isn’t new—liquid smoke has been around for more than 100 years. Ensyn, an Ontario biofuel firm, has become adept at producing competitively priced liquid wood fuels, but very few companies have been able to offer reliable systems to burn these fuels, and none have been successful in the marketplace—until now.

Ranger-Brochure-ClipOne of the keys to burning liquid wood is the pump system that delivers the fuel to the boiler. Liquid wood has to arrive in the boiler at much higher and more specific pressures than natural gas or petroleum, and because it is highly acidic, the pipes must be high-grade stainless steel. This all requires advanced pumping and monitoring equipment, combined with the engineering chops to put the whole system into place. That’s where Preferred Utilities shines.

As a hybrid engineering/manufacturing firm, Preferred is uniquely equipped to devise and implement customized solutions to help commercial and residential properties including universities, colleges, hospitals, and more convert their boilers to liquid wood. Compared to other biofuels that can’t be retrofitted to existing systems, such as wood chips or pellets, the logistics and upfront investment of converting to liquid wood for heating fuel is quite reasonable.

But handling the fuel is one thing. Burning it? Another thing entirely. We’re talking about a substance that is 25% water with the consistency of lemon juice. Burning it effectively presents a significant challenge. That’s why Preferred Utilities developed the Ranger Combustion System. As of May 2017, Preferred Utilities burners are the only known burners capable of effectively and reliably firing liquid wood. There are several installations in Ohio, Vermont, and Maine currently burning this fuel with Preferred Ranger Burners.

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Liquid wood also presents an opportunity to go green quickly. It can take years to transition to carbon neutral, but a liquid wood conversion can be completed in a matter of months. We have found that in many cases this extraordinary fuel source can reduce carbon emissions by about 80 percent. For more information about the potential of using liquid wood at your establishment, contact Preferred Utilities at (203) 743-6741.

 

 

 

 

2015 was an exciting year for us at Preferred Utilities. We launched a series of new online engineering tools, we released the new Flexible System Controller (FSC), and we saw several of our engineers published in energy industry trade magazines.

To cap off the year, we attended the Power-Gen International trade show in Las Vegas, NV. The show featured a new 20×20 island booth and a never-before-seen video highlighting Preferred Special Combustion Engineering.

 

Take a look at the video below for an insight into Preferred’s many combustion capabilities: